Philosophy

We have been taught that rote learning, such as memorization of formulas, is a limited aspect of learning, and that the most valuable learning is that of thinking, aka problem solving.  Indeed, the major success of our system of higher education is the focus on thinking and problem solving.  With the ubiquitous internet, data is readily available for processing by problem solvers.

 

The public is better served by electing problem solvers rather than figures popular for good looks, sound bites, or snappy but unfounded responses.  

 

To vote for someone because that person votes “your” way today is myopic, leaving the important question about what that person will do tomorrow.

 

Votes tomorrow can be predicted by the principles espoused by the candidate, along with a track record that demonstrates fidelity to those principles.  While compromise often is required, standing one’s ground for principle typically is what we should look for in an elected representative.
 

"The reason we say elected representatives perform “public service” is because representation should be about those being represented not about the representative."

There really is an equivalent Hippocratic oath to politics; that it never is practiced is evident by the continuing debasement of our society.  Despite claims to make things better, politicians make things worse.  Too frequently, elected representatives represent their own interests and visions to the exclusion of their oath of office.  The reason we say elected representatives perform “public service” is because representation should be about those being represented not about the representative.

 

My principles for being your commissioner are as follows:

 

  • To protect property rights

  • To protect individual rights

  • To measure decisions against the State and Federal Constitutions

These principles require the following corollaries:

 

  • Never to incur more obligations for the County than currently it has, unless widely required by the people via an initiative, provided the obligations do not directly conflict with the above principles.

  • To reduce obligations, using reasonable approaches that respect that changes in rules/policies need to be spread over time to avoid causing undue damage.  If a current situation would not be viable under the above principles, then plans should be made to remove such an obligation, giving the affected parties ample time to adjust for the changes.

 

All too often we hear an elected representative rebut a complaint on an action by stating that the citizens did not show up at the meeting where the vote took place, so the people cannot complain about a bad vote.  This is an intolerable comment.  Citizens elect a representative to do the right thing, and the citizens should not be required to sit on the representative to make sure that the representative behaves in the best interest of the people.  To this end:  I promise to make decisions compliant with the above principles and corollaries.

"...citizens should not be required to sit on the legislator to make sure that the legislator behaves in the best interest of the people."

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